We are part of Culture!

A project by 100% HUMAN

100%
financed

Project status

Project Goal: 1.000,00 €
Financed: 1.017,93 €
Missing: 0,00 €

We are part of Culture!

Project goals

From 2017-2019, the non-profit project 100% HUMAN shows an art exhibition on the significant contribution of LGBTTIQ* to the political development of Europe. The aim of the exhibition is to break up the common narrative of LGBTTIQ* as victims, and instead present (often groundbreaking) achievements.

With EUR 1,000 we want to support 100% HUMAN to keep this important exhibition up and running.

Project Location

Germany, Europe

Project Details

"Homosexuality is just a trend!" "Gays do not contribute to society!" "Homosexuality should not be portrayed as normal in schools!" "Transsexuality is just imagination!"

Have you heard these narratives before? Or worse ones? Do you also find these statements repulsive and inhumane? Then let's stand up against them together: let's counter positively, colorfully and fact-based. LGBTTIQ* are part of our society and have played an active and positive role in the political and social development of Europe. We are part of this culture. WE ARE PART OF CULTURE!

From 2017-2019, the non-profit project 100% HUMAN shows an art exhibition on the significant contribution of LGBTTIQ* to the political development of Europe. The aim of the exhibition is to break up the common narrative of LGBTTIQ* as victims, and instead present (often groundbreaking) achievements.

30 portraits of homosexual people and people who focused on homosexuality in their work will be on display. People like Frederick II of Prussia, Lili Elbe, Selma Lagerlof, Alan Turing and Virginia Woolf, who had a lasting influence on our culture, politics and society. The artworks by well-known artists, such as Ralf König (Cologne), Robert W. Richards (NY) and Gerda Laufenberg (Cologne) are connected to each other through the colors red, black and white. The accompanying texts for the artworks will be available in German, English, Russian and Arabic. The idea is for the exhibition to be accessible for 200 days in 20 of Germany's largest railway stations.